the Inkblot

Female athletes still feel subtle sting of discrimination at all levels

Photo+obtained+through+Creative+Commons.+
Photo obtained through Creative Commons.

Photo obtained through Creative Commons.

Photo obtained through Creative Commons.

Meredith Prud’homme and Emmanuella Macri

It took women over 2,000 years to be allowed into the Olympic games according to Infoplease.com. Since then, female athletes are slowly becoming more accepted, but not everything is equal between the two sexes, even now.

One of the biggest differences between women and men is the lack of recognition women’s sports receive as compared to men’s, sophomore Grace Treshock of Monmouth Beach said.

“Boys’ soccer and football are a lot more hyped up,” Treshock said.

Freshman Matt Emery of Ocean acknowledges the popularity of men’s professional sports over women’s.

“People watch the NBA a lot more than the WNBA,” Emery said.

Another aspect of sexism is the different standards that males and females have in regards to their appearances while playing sports. According to Inquiries Journal, female athletes’, “…beauty and sex appeal usually overshadow highlights of their on-field endeavors”.

Sophomore Phoebe Drummond of Little Silver, a cross-country runner, has experienced discrimination based on her appearance.

“During the summer, when it’s really hot, the boys on the football team can practice without their shirts on,” Drummond said. “We are not allowed to run in our sports bras.”

But sexism can go both ways, junior Brigid Garrett of Wall says. She believes that the stereotype that sports are for males puts pressure on boys to be athletic.

“Girls feel like they can do things other than sports, but… judgment is passed when a guy doesn’t play a sport,” Garrett said.

The stereotype that men are more athletic than women has been around for some time, but recently the negative connotation that comes with doing something “like a girl” has shifted.

Organizations such as Always are taking measure with their campaign #LikeAGirl to bring awareness to inequality in sports.

Sexism is a long-held tradition, especially in the world of sports. Although some strides have been taken, athletics are still far from equal.

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Female athletes still feel subtle sting of discrimination at all levels