Brunch proves to be a cultural phenomenon for millennials

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Brunch proves to be a cultural phenomenon for millennials

Photo obtained on Pixabay through Creative Commons.

Photo obtained on Pixabay through Creative Commons.

Photo obtained on Pixabay through Creative Commons.

Photo obtained on Pixabay through Creative Commons.

Caroline Collins

To brunch, or not to brunch, that is the question. According to millennials, the answer is always yes. Piper Jaffray’s 27th semi-annual study of teen behavior reports young people now spend more money on food than they do on events or clothing.

Farha Ternikar, an associate professor of sociology at Le Moyne College, digs into the origin of this generation’s favorite weekend ritual in her book “Brunch: A History.”

Brunch began in the Victorian era as an alternative to the traditional, post-church Sunday meal. The word first appeared in print in an 1895 “Hunter’s Weekly” article. By 1950, combining breakfast and lunch had become a movement championed by early metropolitan areas. Today, it is a phenomenon across the country. Senior Julia Pardee of Freehold is a self-proclaimed brunch enthusiast.

“I brunch because I can never decide between breakfast and lunch. So why not both?” Pardee said.

Restaurants typically offer brunch menus between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m providing diners with options galore. Little Prince in SoHo offers a weekend brunch menu that includes baked apple French toast alongside their award-winning French Onion Soup Burger. From the quintessential eggs benedict to avocado toast to French dip, brunch does not conform to the parameters of one meal.

A Twitter-centric 2014 study by the University of Arizona showed that New York City is more obsessed with brunch than any other metropolis. Using hashtag analytics from millions of tweets, researchers found that New Yorkers can’t stop tweeting about “#BottomlessMimosas, #eggs and the Midtown brunchery #Sarabeths.”

Locally, brunch spots top-rated on Yelp include the Molly Pitcher in Red Bank for fine dining, Turning Point in Little Silver for a little bit of everything and The Scone Pony in Spring Lake for a pastry by the beach. Other Yelp honorable mentions include Talulas in Asbury Park, The Avenue in Long Branch, The Buttered Biscuit in Bradley Beach and Seed to Sprout in Avon-by-the-Sea. Senior Allie Kuo of Tinton Falls agrees there is no need to travel far for brunch when the Jersey Shore is full of food for thought.

So put on your ‘Resting Brunch Face,’ get your Instagram ready and cheers to a fabulous brunch.

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