Billionaires waste money on Notre Dame reconstruction

According+to+the+Washington+Post%2C+an+estimated+%24835+million+had+been+offered+to+save+the+cathedral+in+one+week+alone%2C+and+the+amount+continues+to+climb.%0Ahttps%3A%2F%2Fcreativecommons.org%2Flicenses%2Fby%2F2.0%2F
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Billionaires waste money on Notre Dame reconstruction

According to the Washington Post, an estimated $835 million had been offered to save the cathedral in one week alone, and the amount continues to climb.
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

According to the Washington Post, an estimated $835 million had been offered to save the cathedral in one week alone, and the amount continues to climb. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Creative commons photo courtesy of Pixabay

According to the Washington Post, an estimated $835 million had been offered to save the cathedral in one week alone, and the amount continues to climb. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Creative commons photo courtesy of Pixabay

Creative commons photo courtesy of Pixabay

According to the Washington Post, an estimated $835 million had been offered to save the cathedral in one week alone, and the amount continues to climb. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Madison Vigdor

Not too long after a fire ravaged the Notre Dame Cathedral on Apr. 15, billionaires virtually threw their money at its burnt remains. Businessman Francois-Henri Pinault started the trend with his donation of $112 million and was followed by a chain of egotistical magnates, some investing up to three times that number for the sake of a financial competition.

According to the Washington Post, an estimated $835 million had been offered to save the cathedral in one week alone, and the amount continues to climb. Rather than repairing a building that showcases more charm and history with its battle scars than without, French billionaires should focus on the more pressing issues that affect more than just tourists.

Within France alone, the Secours Catalogue shows that there are approximately 8.8 million people living below the poverty line – 8.8 million people wondering where their next meal will come from – while the wealthy show no concern. They refuse to bat an eyelash while sitting on piles of money, even as their own suffering citizens beg for help on the streets of Paris.

Rob Hansen, the founder of the philanthropy-based organization Goodnation, commented on billionaires’ inconsistent use of money. “The takeaway form Notre-Dame is, if that can happen in 24 hours, the resources are there to take on major issues.” 

Although many around the world have expressed sadness over the loss of an iconic landmark, the practicality of the rebuilt cathedral is baffling itself. The Pew Research center found that barely 5% of the French population attends church regularly, despite 64% identifying as Christian.

As the faith of the French decreases, the need for the cathedral decreases as well. If not to act as a space to practice religion and guide worshippers through their lives, the Notre Dame Cathedral is just as useful in ash as it is without a dent.

The millions of dollars raised for a now nonexistent cause should be given to those who still need that guiding source and sliver of hope. As those who originally built the Notre Dame Cathedral intended; it should be given to the community.

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